Today Japan is known for its minimalism and simplicity because of their Zen culture. But how to make a Zen-home in a girlish style? How to combine calmness and little sweet details? Here is a nice example how to do it. The interior is done in a truly Japanese way: with cherry blossoms, traditional colors, natural wood and simple shapes, nothing bizarre. Despite of it, there are many nice girlish details like pastel colors, beautiful accessories and lots of flowers everywhere. I love the decoration of the wall with hooks. It looks natural and is very functional – you can place shelves or hang some things on them. This interior is an amazing example of exquisite and functional combination of styles.

AT Casa had a great post featuring a slide show of modern loft spaces from all over the world recently — I've picked a few that I especially liked. Enjoy. 

Today I'm admiring a great modern twist on the vanitas still life genre by artist James Hopkins, who takes this rather morbid theme and gives it a playful interpretation, with his creation of skulls formed by the clever arrangement of various everyday objects on bookshelves.

Interior designer, blogger, stylist and owner of the online store Moltaz Design, Henrick Eriksson has applied his design philosophy to his lovely summer home, a cottage dating from 1780. When he purchased it, its charming rough log walls and old oak floors were — unbelievably — hidden behind plastic wallpaper and cork tiles respectively. Henrick also tackled low ceilings, lack of insulation and removed the gypsum plaster from the walls, taking them back to their original condition. Renovating the house bit by bit made it manageable within his busy work schedule — and the resulting style of the cottage is described by Henrick as 'New England with industrial touches'. As he works with colour all day, Henrick deliberately chose a restful and neutral palette for his own space, concentrating on textures, form and materials to keep it lively and interesting.

For Femina editor Camilla Kjems, years of busy family life with children, teens and two dogs had left her home's main living space a jumble of odd pieces of furniture, toys and belongings that had simply drifted there when they had nowhere else to go. On a tight budget but with the enthusiastic approval of the whole family, the entire room was updated, saving money by cleverly repainting and recovering furniture, investing in great wallpaper and completely reorganizing the space, It's still very much a family room, but one with an edgier and more grown up style.

This stunning space is the home of Melbourne, Australia-based couple Lauren and David Seeman, recent co-founders of Patchy Rugs – an import company specializing in Turkish over-dyed and patchwork rugs. Love their amazing eye — fantastic taste in art, carpets (naturally) and design.

London-based designer Kenyon Yeh has created the Lipa side table. Made from powder-coated steel, the side table is available in round or square top. According to the designer, “LIPA is made from one sheet of laser-cut steel then simply bent to form the sturdy legs and surface. The beauty part is, there is no certain angle telling which side should be the front. Every angle can be used as the front part depends which side brings the most appealing view. Making LIPA simple, unique as a practical and sculptural side table, nightstand or plant stand anywhere in home or public spaces.


Daybeds are beautiful no matter the setting. Whether French or Italian the daybed is timeless. Add a mix of pillows in coordinating textiles.  Pull it up to a dining table for instant seating or float it in a room. The daybed is versatile, fun, and adds a punch of creativity to any space. Try one!


Sometime back in 2008, the CG Society organized a contest that invited digital artists from around the globe to present their most imaginative and grandest futuristic vision for the new world through architecture and landscape design. The end results were amazingly impressive and immeasurable to what we normally see on a daily basis. Though it’s been a while since this competition has ended, we wanted to acknowledge the winners, as well as show our viewers what the creative process can do in conceptually building innovative and inspiring structures and civilizations with the future of design in mind!

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